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Gabriele
11 August 2007 @ 08:58 pm
— Por que o Bin Laden não matou os próprios pais?

— Porque ele os ama.
 
 
Current Mood: quixotic
 
 
Gabriele
27 July 2007 @ 02:56 am


I can’t deny that living in Cândido Mota has started increasing my knowledge on fauna and flora (which means new words for my vocabulary, both in Portuguese and – since I’m bloody curious – English). The last examples I can think of were:
Crotophaga ani (Smooth-billed Ani)
Eugenia brasiliensis (Grumichama)
Pyrostegia venusta (Flame Vine, Orange Trumpet Creeper)
Solanum insidiosum (Jurumbeba)

Sure, most of such names belonging to specific Brazilian (or at least tropical) specimens, names are often variations of their local standard names anyway (Grumichama is a curious variation of our grumixama, and Jurumbeba is an alternative spelling of jurubeba in Portuguese itself). My curiosity often spreads (usually through the Wikipedia) to other languages as well, but once again it gets even trickier. After all, how many French speakers can really tell what a cerisier du Brésil is, and are Germans any familiar with Feuerranken?
 
 
Gabriele
16 June 2007 @ 03:09 pm
Esta é simplesmente infame…

― Qual é a casa da ovelha?

― É a LAN house.
 
 
Gabriele
31 May 2007 @ 03:08 pm
Uma palavra interessante (tradução livre para o português):

onironauta

E uma palavra esteticamente horrível (do chinês):

卡拉OK
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Uma palavra interessante (tradução livre para o português):

onironauta

E uma palavra esteticamente horrível (do chinês):

卡拉OK
<kǎlā'ōukèi>

Sim, significa “caraoquê” em mandarim.
 
 
Gabriele
29 May 2007 @ 09:05 pm
A cara que a Miss Japão fez ao anunciarem o segundo lugar da Miss Brasil (e conseqüentemente sua própria coroação como Miss Universo) foi impagável:



Arregalou ou não os olhinhos puxados?
 
 
 
Gabriele
29 May 2007 @ 03:11 pm
When I was a child, the Miss Brazil and Miss Universe contests were still big here – I remember watching them with my family, and people making comments about the contestants in conversations. It wasn’t so big as it’d been in the 1950s and 1960s, though, and the popularity decreased even more in the 1990s when they even stopped being regularly aired by Brazilian TV channels. A couple of years ago, though, Band started focusing on them, and it seems they’ve regained some of their charm. Last year I happened to watched the Miss Brazil contest (every Brazilian state has their own miss, usually chosen from internal regional pageants, and so we usually have 27 girls competing for Miss Brazil – 26 from the states and one from the Federal District), and tonight, for the first time in probably two decades, I watched the Miss Universe pageant with my mum.

We haven’t had a Brazilian Miss Universe since 1968 (Martha Vasconcellos), and we’ve had only another one (Ieda Maria Vargas, in 1963), so it was nice to have a strong candidate to root for this year. It was exciting to wait for the results, especially when Brazil was classified among the top 15, then top 10, and then among the 5 semifinalists

-Brasil


Venezuela was regarded by some as the favourite, but among these five she was 4th for me, followed only by the USA, which was a huge surprise among the top 5 considering she didn’t look particularly beautiful or interesting (though she did look friendly) and even slipped and fell over during the gown competition. Among the other three, my preferences were Brazil, Korea, and then Japan (Julien often points out I always seem to prefer Korean girls when given pictures of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese girls to choose from). Not surprisingly, the USA was the 4th runner-up, then followed by Korea and Venezuela. With Brazil and Japan left, we were sure Brazil would win, but Japan actually did.

In the overall chart of winning years by country in the world, Brazil comes 5th, tied with Finland, Thailand, Philippines, Australia, Trinidad and Tobago, Canada, India, and now also Japan, all with two winners each; it also comes 5th, tied with Finland, if the runner-up positions are also considered in the calculation. In both situations, the first four places belong to the USA, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Sweden, respectively.

Linguistically speaking, I was even discussing with my mum how curious it is that the word ‘miss’, in the sense used in such contests, was first rendered in Portuguese as misse /ˈmi.si/, which now sounds markedly outdated. It’s still common to hear old(er) people refer to such pageants as concursos de misse /kõˈkuR.suz.diˈmi.si/. The current, modern use and pronunciation is just miss /ˈmis/.
 
 
Gabriele
12 April 2007 @ 03:06 pm
Lendo um artigo da INFO Online, o próprio título já me soou estranho: “Fusão entre Vivo e TIM só no longo prazo”. “No longo/médio/curto prazo” me soa horrível e tenho certeza de que nunca havia ouvido isso antes. Fui até confirmar nas minhas fontes e todas só dão mesmo como válido o que para mim é obviamente natural: “a longo/médio/curto prazo”. A, não em. Fico imaginando se foi questão de má tradução ou se foi hipercorreção por terem suposto que a preposição a agora é marca de galicismo… O que me surpreende é que usar em me soa tão agramatical que, se não soubesse, juraria que nem mesmo foi um falante nativo quem escreveu o texto.